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SEC filings
F-1
BIOLINERX LTD. filed this Form F-1 on 10/02/2012
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A Non-Electing U.S. Investor who wishes to make a QEF election for a subsequent year may be able to make a special “purging election” pursuant to Section 1291(d) of the Code. Pursuant to this election, a Non-Electing U.S. Investor would be treated as selling his or her stock for fair market value on the first day of the taxable year for which the QEF election is made. Any gain on such deemed sale would be subject to tax under the rules for Non-Electing U.S. Investors as discussed above. Non-Electing U.S. Investors are encouraged to consult their tax advisors regarding the availability of a “purging election” as well as other available elections.
 
To the extent a distribution on our Shares does not constitute an excess distribution to a Non-Electing U.S. Investor, such Non-Electing U.S. Investor generally will be required to include the amount of such distribution in gross income as a dividend to the extent of our current or accumulated earnings and profits (as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes) that are not allocated to excess distributions. The tax consequences of such distributions are discussed above under “— Taxation of U.S. Investors — Distributions.” Each U.S. Investor is encouraged to consult its own tax advisor with respect to the appropriate U.S. federal income tax treatment of any distribution on our Shares.
 
If we are treated as a PFIC for any taxable year during the holding period of a Non-Electing U.S. Investor, we will continue to be treated as a PFIC for all succeeding years during which the Non-Electing U.S. Investor is treated as a direct or indirect Non-Electing U.S. Investor even if we are not a PFIC for such years. A U.S. Investor is encouraged to consult its tax advisor with respect to any available elections that may be applicable in such a situation, including the “deemed sale” election of Code Section 1298(b)(1). In addition, U.S. Investors should consult their tax advisors regarding the IRS information reporting and filing obligations that may arise as a result of the ownership of shares in a PFIC.
 
We may invest in the equity of foreign corporations that are PFICs or may own subsidiaries that own PFICs. U.S. Investors will be subject to the PFIC rules with respect to their indirect ownership interests in such PFICs, such that a disposition of the shares of the PFIC or receipt by us of a distribution from the PFIC generally will be treated as a deemed disposition of such shares or the deemed receipt of such distribution by the U.S. Investor, subject to taxation under the PFIC rules. There can be no assurance that a U.S. Investor will be able to make a QEF election or a mark-to-market election with respect to PFICs in which we invest. Each U.S. Investor is encouraged to consult its own tax advisor with respect to tax consequences of an investment by us in a corporation that is a PFIC.
 
The U.S. federal income tax rules relating to PFICs are complex. U.S. Investors are urged to consult their own tax advisors with respect to the purchase, ownership and disposition of Shares, any elections available with respect to such Shares and the IRS information reporting obligations with respect to the purchase, ownership and disposition of Shares.
 
Certain Reporting Requirements
 
Certain U.S. Investors are required to file IRS Form 926, Return by U.S. Transferor of Property to a Foreign Corporation, and certain U.S. Investors may be required to file IRS Form 5471, Information Return of U.S. Persons With Respect to Certain Foreign Corporations, reporting transfers of cash or other property to us and information relating to the U.S. Investor and us. Substantial penalties may be imposed upon a U.S. Investor that fails to comply. Each U.S. Investor should consult its own tax advisor regarding these requirements.
 
In addition, recently enacted legislation imposes new reporting requirements for the holder of certain foreign financial assets, including equity of foreign entities, if the aggregate value of all of these assets exceeds $50,000. The Shares are expected to be subject to these new reporting requirements unless the Shares are held in an account at a domestic financial institution. The requirement to file a report is effective for taxable years beginning after March 18, 2010. Penalties apply to any failure to file a required report. U.S. Investors should consult their own tax advisors regarding the application of this legislation.